Punishment for criminals essay

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Note : Where a country has abolished, re-instated, and abolished again (. Philippines, Switzerland, Portugal) only the later abolition date is included. Countries who have abolished and since reinstated (. Liberia) are not included. Non-independent territories are considered to be under the jurisdiction of their parent country – which leads to unexpectedly late abolition dates for the UK, New Zealand and the Netherlands, where Jersey (UK), the Cook Is (NZ), and the Netherlands Antilles, were the last territories of those states to abolish capital punishment, and all were rather later than the more well known abolitions on the respective mainlands. Defunct countries such as the GDR (East Germany), which abolished capital punishment in 1987 but was dissolved in 1990, are also not included. References are in the continental tables above and not repeated here.

As of 2015-MAY, Amnesty International sells a remarkable unisex T-shirt that shows the . states that still have the death penalty as red stars and those that don't as white stars. The star representing Texas appears to have trailing blood smear, apparently because of the enormous number of executions per capita in that state. The caption says "Abolish the Death Penalty." Amnesty International is working to ensure that more red stars will flip to white. They enclose a stencil with some fabric paint so that you can change red stars to white as additional states abolish capital punishment. See: http:///   offers free shipping for Amazon Prime members.

Preamble
Art. I : Crime under International Law
Art. II : Genocide defined
Art. III : Punishable acts
Art. IV : Responsible individuals
Art. V : National legislation
Art. VI : Tribunals Art. VII : Extradition
Art. VIII : Prevention and Suppression
Art. IX : Disputes submitted to the Int'l Court of Justice
Art. X : Languages
Art. XI : Signature, ratification and accession
Art. XII : Territories
Art. XIII : Entry into force Art. XIV : Time period in effect
Art. XV : Denunciations
Art. XVI : Revision
Art. XVII : Notification
Art. XVIII : Deposit and transmittal
Art. XIX : Registration The Contracting Parties, Having considered the declaration made by the General Assembly of the United Nations in its resolution 96 (I) dated 11 December 1946 that genocide is a crime under international law, contrary to the spirit and aims of the United Nations and condemned by the civilized world, Recognizing that at all periods of history genocide has inflicted great losses on humanity, and Being convinced that, in order to liberate mankind from such an odious scourge, international co-operation is required, Hereby agree as hereinafter provided:  Article I: The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.  Article II: In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: (a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. 

Punishment for criminals essay

punishment for criminals essay

Preamble
Art. I : Crime under International Law
Art. II : Genocide defined
Art. III : Punishable acts
Art. IV : Responsible individuals
Art. V : National legislation
Art. VI : Tribunals Art. VII : Extradition
Art. VIII : Prevention and Suppression
Art. IX : Disputes submitted to the Int'l Court of Justice
Art. X : Languages
Art. XI : Signature, ratification and accession
Art. XII : Territories
Art. XIII : Entry into force Art. XIV : Time period in effect
Art. XV : Denunciations
Art. XVI : Revision
Art. XVII : Notification
Art. XVIII : Deposit and transmittal
Art. XIX : Registration The Contracting Parties, Having considered the declaration made by the General Assembly of the United Nations in its resolution 96 (I) dated 11 December 1946 that genocide is a crime under international law, contrary to the spirit and aims of the United Nations and condemned by the civilized world, Recognizing that at all periods of history genocide has inflicted great losses on humanity, and Being convinced that, in order to liberate mankind from such an odious scourge, international co-operation is required, Hereby agree as hereinafter provided:  Article I: The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.  Article II: In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such: (a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group. 

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