Foreshadowing essays

In short, I’m concerned that too much of the New Weird is painting itself into a corner by going the post-horror route and abandoning or limiting the one resource that should enable weirdness above all: the imagination. Is there a place for imaginative literature that sidesteps all the current genre conventions and clichés? Absolutely. Does that literature need supportive and dedicated journals and presses, like S&TT7 , in order to attain the visibility and recognition it can’t get through more traditional genre channels? Very probably. Should that literature only define itself negatively, by avoiding genre conventions and clichés? Perhaps not. Is there an onus on literature which does avoid those conventions to prove itself by opposing those conventions with something equally powerful? Very probably. Look at Mervyn Peake’s Gormenghast cycle: an imaginative accomplishment of world building that owed very little to other genres. Yet it created a subgenre, the fantasy of manners. It’s hard to imagine Jeff VanderMeer’s Ambergris cycle without it, let alone Michael Moorcock’s Gloriana . And right now, where do I see that level of imaginative and intellectual vigor and inventiveness? In the work of N. K. Jemisin, China Miéville, and Neil Gaiman — all of them taking traditional genres to some very different places indeed.

Foreshadowing essays

foreshadowing essays

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