Essays about eveline

“There is no more miserable human being than one in whom nothing is habitual but indecision (James).” Originally appearing in Dubliners, a compilation of vignettes by James Joyce, his short story Eveline is the tale of such an unfortunate individual. Anxious, timid, scared, perhaps even terrified -- all these describe Eveline. She is a frightened, indecisive young woman poised between her past and her future.

Eveline loves her father but is fearful of him. She tries to hold onto good memories of her father, thinking “sometimes he could be very nice (Joyce 5),” but has seen what her father has done to her siblings when he would “hunt them in out of the field with his blackthorn stick (Joyce 4).” As of late she has begun to feel “herself in danger of her father’s violence (Joyce 4).” Ironically, her father has “begun to threaten her and say what he’d do to her only for her dead mother’s sake (Joyce 5).”

Eveline wants a new life but is afraid to let go of her past. She dreams of a place where “people would treat her with respect (Joyce 4)” and when contemplating her future, hopes “to explore a new life with Frank (Joyce 5).” When, in a moment of terror she realizes that “she must escape (Joyce 6),” it seems to steel her determination to make a new home for herself elsewhere. On the other hand, she is comfortable with the “familiar objects from which she had never dreamed of being divided (Joyce 4).” She rationalizes that: “In her home anyway she had shelter and food; she had those whom she had known all her life about her (Joyce 4).” As she reflects on her past she discovers “now that she was about to leave it she did not find it a wholly undesirable life (Joyce 5).”

Eveline wants to keep the deathbed pledge made to her mother but is alarmed at the prospect of sharing her mother’s fate. Her mother was ill-treated in life and Eveline vows that “she would not be treated as her mother had been (Joyce 4).” She has had a life filled with hardship and chafes under “her promise to keep the home together as long as she could (Joyce 6).” When she recalls “the pitiful vision of her mother’s life (Joyce 6)” she...

Eveline could not forget the promise she had made to her dying mother. The promise was “to keep the home together as long as she could” (6). Being raised Catholic; it was very difficult for Eveline not to keep the promise. She also was to care for her abusive father and the two young children who were left in her care. She was very fearful of her abusive, bad-tempered father. Eveline felt like she “had nobody to protect her” (5). One of her brothers, Ernest, was dead and Harry was always away for business. She continues to sit and remember memories from her childhood. Then, Eveline begins to think about the times her father was nice. She realizes that her father is getting old and he would miss her if she left. She then remembers her mother’s last words: “Derevaum Seraun! Derevaum Seraun!” (6) This means the end of pleasure is pain. Eveline then “stood up in a sudden impulse of terror. Escape! She must escape! Frank

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