Brevity magazine craft essays

Previously published stories
Blatant self-promotion
Promotional jargon
Meaningless rambling
Calling to get permission to submit or to follow-up on a submission
Flashy presentations – no colors, HTML, wild or bright stationary or clever use of software
Documents on subjects they don’t deal with or without warning
Mention of a product or person in the subject line
Locked PDF documents
Use of the “important” flag in email submissions
Request for acknowledgment of receipt of email (return receipt)
Contradictory information within the same piece
Offers of gifts or “incentives” – this is seriously frowned upon

Spanish-speaking literature has many authors of microstories, including Augusto Monterroso ("El dinosaurio") and Luis Felipe Lomelí (" El Emigrante "). Their microstories are some of the shortest ever written in that language. In Spain, authors of microrrelatos (very short fictions) have included Andrés Neuman , Ramón Gómez de la Serna , José Jiménez Lozano , Javier Tomeo , José María Merino , Juan José Millás , and Óscar Esquivias . [15] In Argentina, notable contemporary contributors to the genre have included Marco Denevi , Luisa Valenzuela , and Ana María Shua .

But, how can the New Yorker be a useful model? What creates the “quality” that you’re recommending is the specific way that it executes long-form journalism. Are you suggesting that content marketers create their own journalism operations? Because, what gives the New Yorker its credibility is in no small measure due to the fact that it is positioned *outside* the government or any company that it covers, which in a nutshell is the most meaningful difference between content marketing and journalism. Creating quality content is easier said than done. And that seems beyond obvious to me.

First thanks for the powerful tool.
I’m curious about a technicality. I’d like to know if is it OK to divide the single sentence into shorter periods. I mean, if I try to read the whole sentence of the premise in a single time I end up breathless. I think that it is the “concept” that must be taken into a possible single sentence, but if I put some commas and some full stops I think it doesn’t change a lot.
So the premise with stops sounds could sound as follows:
—————————
When 17-year-old Bella agrees to move to nowheresville Forks, Arizona,
and live with her estranged father, she finds herself powerfully drawn
to classmate and bad-boy vampire Edward Cullen. Bella and Cullen begin an
obsessive love affair culminating in her desire to be turned into a
vampire, until the affair and Bella’s life are threatened by James, a
predatory vampire who targets Bella for death. James is a hunter and for him Bella is a “hard
target,” the most challenging kind of prays for hunters. This threat leads Bella to
unite with Edward and his vampire family, who kill James, effectively
bringing Bella closer into the vampire fold.
————————-
I’m humbly asking if it is ok for a good premise writing, to divide the sentence in shorter periods or if there is a good reason to keep everything together.
Apologies for my English (I’m Italian).
Thanks for your (plural here) precious help.

His acting is the gateway drug. Each ’bitch on Reddit, Facebook , Twitter, or Tumblr has her own story of having discovered Cumberbatch via some role—the earlier the discovery the greater the pride and sense of ownership—and having gone into a hole of binge-watching everything he’d ever done (yes, he was that slightly familiar face in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and War Horse ). It comes down to character, writes Jana Prikryl, a senior editor of the New York Review of Books, who published a long free-verse poem about him in the London Review of Books imagining the two of them leaving a party together and praising “his quips and winning / earnest wish to answer / every question, / and be very very nice.” When he speaks, it’s with passion, one Reddit user wrote; “that’s when you notice the bright twinkle in his eyes, the huge grin, the crinkles that span his cheeks.” Another Reddit user, who first attached the phrase “the thinking women’s crumpet” to Cumberbatch, wrote: “You could simply watch any one of his many performances where he could make your jaw (and panties) drop with a simple look or gesture.” They also talk about his arms, his torso (there’s a six-pack under there, albeit a pale one), his adorable difficulty saying the word penguin (he called them “pengwings” and “penglings” in an unearthed nature documentary), and his ability to be “both masculine and sensitive at the same time, beautiful without being the least bit effeminate.” And of course there’s his voice—“the best remedy when you’re having a bad day or you just want to close your eyes and relax,” one Cumberbitch tells me. Says another, “The raw power behind it leaves you in awe and you wish he could read a book to you.” Cumberbatch is the boyfriend you want to wake up next to while Holmes is the man you hope will ravage you.

Brevity magazine craft essays

brevity magazine craft essays

First thanks for the powerful tool.
I’m curious about a technicality. I’d like to know if is it OK to divide the single sentence into shorter periods. I mean, if I try to read the whole sentence of the premise in a single time I end up breathless. I think that it is the “concept” that must be taken into a possible single sentence, but if I put some commas and some full stops I think it doesn’t change a lot.
So the premise with stops sounds could sound as follows:
—————————
When 17-year-old Bella agrees to move to nowheresville Forks, Arizona,
and live with her estranged father, she finds herself powerfully drawn
to classmate and bad-boy vampire Edward Cullen. Bella and Cullen begin an
obsessive love affair culminating in her desire to be turned into a
vampire, until the affair and Bella’s life are threatened by James, a
predatory vampire who targets Bella for death. James is a hunter and for him Bella is a “hard
target,” the most challenging kind of prays for hunters. This threat leads Bella to
unite with Edward and his vampire family, who kill James, effectively
bringing Bella closer into the vampire fold.
————————-
I’m humbly asking if it is ok for a good premise writing, to divide the sentence in shorter periods or if there is a good reason to keep everything together.
Apologies for my English (I’m Italian).
Thanks for your (plural here) precious help.

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