Architectural thesis topics + pdf

While there are many wide-ranging opinions about architecture’s ideal role in society, there is a general agreement that an architect’s work does influence how a society functions and evolves. In a world that is grappling with myriad serious issues like climate change, population growth, and an inequitable distribution of resources, it benefits young architecture students to acquaint themselves with the larger picture, and to choose a topic that at least aims to solve a current socio-environmental problem through a design intervention.

Will be composed of two parts. The first one is a 260 hour project work during which the partecipants will do a post-occupancy evaluation of one or more buildings or public areas belonging or not to the society they come from, each of them dealing with their own setting. This investigation will be carried out through in situ studies, interviews to users, focus groups, and photos, after a 15 hour lesson to arrange the final dissertation. The aim is to take control of the instruments given by the Master. The second part of 100 hours will be necessary to write the final dissertation. 

MA/MSc programmes include three academic terms of taught courses that conclude in late June, followed by a dissertation writing period leading up to the submission of final coursework in September. MArch programmes include two phases of study. Phase 1 consists of three academic terms of studio design and taught coursework concluding in late June. Following a summer break, all students return in September and undertake Phase 2 Thesis Design projects, which are submitted and presented the following January. The MFA and MPhil courses are similarly organised in two phases, with a longer Phase 2 that concludes the course in March/May of the second year of studies. The PhD programme normally includes three years of full-time study and a final year of part-time enrolment during the preparation of the final PhD submission.

One of the more striking aspects of the DSP experience was the way that the Naked Objects technique permitted re-use very actively. Once a domain object, such as a Customer, had been defined for one 'application' it could be (has been) readily adapted with the minimum of tweaking and addition for use elsewhere. This suggests that the approach could become a favourite in government circles, where re-use is seen as a powerful technique for breaking down siloed systems. The UK 'Transformational Government' policy is particularly keen to see re-use become a standard requirement of new government systems, both consuming other governmental system components and making new ones available for others to use. This re-use is often seen in terms of services, but objects could be an equally powerful approach.

Le Corbusier’s answer to the standardization of the construction industry was his modular. It was developed on the principles of proportions set forth by the “Golden Section” and Fibonacci sequences. However unlike his predecessors, Le Corbusier regulated his proportional schema to the realm of relative rather than absolute standards (34). “Taking man in his environment, instead of [utilizing] universals” Le Corbusier was able to quell some skeptics due to its lack of “metaphysical connotations”(35) Le Corbusier stated in his own manifesto that “man looks at the creation of architecture with his eyes, which are 5 feet 6 inches from the ground (Fig. 13).(36)” Relating the human body to Modulor enabled a “co-ordination at every level from town planning to furniture.”(37) The Modulor which consisted of “two divergent series of irrational numbers derived from the Golden Section” had its roots in the early proportional explorations by Le Corbusier in his work on the purist Villas like that of Graches (Fig. 12)(38).

Architectural thesis topics + pdf

architectural thesis topics + pdf

One of the more striking aspects of the DSP experience was the way that the Naked Objects technique permitted re-use very actively. Once a domain object, such as a Customer, had been defined for one 'application' it could be (has been) readily adapted with the minimum of tweaking and addition for use elsewhere. This suggests that the approach could become a favourite in government circles, where re-use is seen as a powerful technique for breaking down siloed systems. The UK 'Transformational Government' policy is particularly keen to see re-use become a standard requirement of new government systems, both consuming other governmental system components and making new ones available for others to use. This re-use is often seen in terms of services, but objects could be an equally powerful approach.

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